Loss is an inevitable occurrence that most people will experience at some point in life. It is usual for you to grieve as a natural reaction to loss. While grieving, you may have periods of distress, sorrow, numbness, anger, and sometimes guilt. These feelings may gradually fade away as you come to terms with the loss and move forward. While there is no limited time for grieving, some people experience painful emotions for an extended time, which affects their quality of life. If your feelings of loss are debilitating, it is best to seek help from your adult psychiatrist in Midtown East, as it could be a sign of complicated grief or persistent complex bereavement disorder.

What is grief?

Grief is a natural reaction to the loss of someone or something you love. It is characterized by emotional suffering, which can be overwhelming. While grieving, you may experience all kinds of emotions, from intense sadness to guilt, anger, disbelief, yearning, and shock. The pain resulting from grief can indirectly affect your physical health as usual activities like eating, sleeping, and thinking straight can become challenging. Grief intensity varies for each person depending on factors like belief, background, and the relationship to what was lost. Although grief is a normal reaction to sadness, having a heightened state of mourning that can keep you from moving on may signify you to see a mental health professional.

Types of grief

· Anticipatory grief

This type of grief develops before a loss rather than after. There are different instances when you may start grieving your loss before it comes to pass. For example, if your loved one has a terminal illness or is close to retiring from work.

· Complicated grief

Complicated grief leaves you stuck in a state of bereavement, especially after losing your loved ones. The pain may never completely disappear and ends up affecting your quality of life.

· Disenfranchised grief

This is grieving where others do not recognize your loss or devalue and stigmatize it.

What kind of loss causes grief?

Most of the time, grieving is associated with the death of a loved one which often results in the most intense type of grief. However, any loss can cause distress, for example:

  • Loss of health
  • Losing a job
  • A miscarriage
  • Death of a pet
  • Retirement
  • Selling your home
  • Loss of a friendship
  • A relationship breakup or divorce

Grieving is a personal experience and should not be limited to specific events or circumstances. Slight losses in life such as graduating from university, changing jobs, and moving away from home can also trigger a sense of grief. Regardless of whom or what you have lost, you should not shy away about how you feel or have an impression that certain things do not need grieving. It is normal to feel sad and other emotions if the lost animal, person, situation, or relationship is essential to your life. Whatever the cause of your grief, there are healthy ways to help you cope with the emotions, come to terms with your loss, and gradually move on with your life.

If you are having a hard time coping with grief, book a session with your specialist at Healthy Minds NYC for counseling to help you move on with life.

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Loss is an inevitable occurrence that most people will experience at some point in life. It is usual for you to grieve as a natural reaction to loss. While grieving, you may have periods of distress, sorrow, numbness, anger, and sometimes guilt. These feelings may gradually fade away as...