All you need to know about Osteoporosis

Reaching the menopause stage is a healthy and natural thing for all women. Experiencing bone fractures during menopause is, however, an unfair and unwelcome experience. Studies show that one in two postmenopausal women experience bone fractures. These fractures are otherwise known as postmenopausal osteoporosis. If you begin to notice fractures resulting from low trauma, you need to visit an experienced healthcare provider such as Dr. Patricia Brougher, an OB/GYN with over thirty years of experience.

Postmenopausal osteoporosis occurs when there’s a reduction of bone strength, making you susceptible to fractures. This condition is characterized by skeletal fragility, and its costs and risks outweigh those of other conditions such as breast cancer and strokes.

For instance, in the US, if you have postmenopausal osteoporosis, you could end up paying 18 billion dollars by 2025.

These shocking facts are why you should go for regular screening to help you get the best treatment options for this condition.

What Do the Numbers Say?

Osteoporosis affects approximately 8.6 million and 1.6 million women and men, respectively. Unfortunately, there’s a rapid increase in the number of people growing old, which means a potential increase in osteoporosis patients.

Growing old becomes a burden when you can’t even walk independently or are unable to do any activity. This just goes to show that a sense of urgency is required to prevent you from getting to the severe stage where nothing can be done.

Do Genes Matter?

Osteoporosis is your body’s response to bone loss that exceeds bone growth. Hormones such as estrogen and testosterone are essential for bone formulation and maintenance. Estrogen is withdrawn when you get to menopause, meaning your bone is resorbed faster than it is formed.

The genetic composition can cause a quicker progression of postmenopausal osteoporosis in some women more than others.

What About Your Race and Ethnicity?

Osteoporosis affects women of all races and ethnic groups. However, thin postmenopausal Caucasian women are more susceptible to this condition.

Risk Factors

There are two types of risk factors, namely modifiable and fixed. This is why you should go for early screening once you get to menopause so that your doctor can examine your body weight, bone mineral density and also determine whether your genes play a role.

The two highest risk factors are early menopause and low body weight as they accelerate bone loss. Additionally, if you are on birth control during the early menopause stage, you also increase your chances of getting osteoporosis. This is because some medication contains depot medroxyprogesterone, which reduces bone density.

Screening and Diagnosis

As mentioned earlier, it’s better to go for early detection rather than wait until you being to experience some symptoms. This is especially crucial for those who are predisposed due to their genes, ethnicity, and body weight.

Additionally, those with autoimmune disorders and have been using steroids for an extended period should get screened early.

How Do You Manage Postmenopausal Osteoporosis?

As always, prevention is better than cure. Studies show that including fruits and vegetables reduces the chance of bone loss as you get older. Women over 50 years are advised to take a minimum of 1200mg of calcium daily.

Aside from a healthy diet, regular aerobic exercises promote healthy bones, thereby reducing the chances of early menopausal osteoporosis.

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All you need to know about Osteoporosis Reaching the menopause stage is a healthy and natural thing for all women. Experiencing bone fractures during menopause is, however, an unfair and unwelcome experience. Studies show that one in two postmenopausal women experience bone fractures. These fractures are otherwise known as postmenopausal...