Research shows that 30% of women in the prime of their childbearing years suffer from chronic pelvic pain, though most of them fail to seek medical treatment. If only this percentage knew how simple the solution is, they would consult a Sugar Land pelvic congestion syndrome specialist. The persistent pain of vein valves in the pelvis caused by malfunction result in blood pools that lead to dilation of veins. A corrective procedure will get your abnormal vein blocked, thus, relieving you from pain and pressure. Below is some Q&A of pelvic congestion syndrome:

How will you know you are affected by pelvic congestion syndrome?

Often confused for menstrual pain, pelvic congestion syndrome also affects the pelvis. Most patients feel dull or dragging pain on their lower backs. You will specifically feel this pain when standing, during intercourse, and worsens when you near the menstrual period. You will also have an irritable bladder and stool with bouts of alternating diarrhea and constipation. Additionally, PCS might make you experience premenstrual syndrome symptoms like bloating, mood swings, and headaches. However, you will feel relief after a night’s sleep.

What causes PCS?

PCS is initiated by the presence of varicose veins around the ovaries. The abnormal functioning of your valve will result in the dilation of veins. When your pelvic veins dilate because of blood pooling around your pelvis, you will feel chronic pain that might drag on for some time.

How is the syndrome diagnosed?

Pelvic venography is thought to be the most accurate method of PCS’s diagnosis. An X-ray dye is injected in the pelvic veins for visibility during the X-ray. However, an MRI is the best alternative form of a non-invasive method of diagnosis.

Is it possible to get PCS after menopause?

It is unusual for any woman to develop pelvic congestion syndrome after menopause, thanks to the dramatic reduction of the female sex hormones. This depletion of sex hormones results in the drop of blood supply to the pelvis. However, if your veins are very dilated, you might experience PCS after menopause.

How is pelvic congestion syndrome treated?

PCS’s most effective treatment is ovarian vein embolization. This minimally invasive treatment is done under local anesthesia and sedation. Your radiologist will make a pocket incision to pave the way for a thin needle with a catheter and guidewire through to your femoral vein. Using X-ray as his guide, the radiologist steadily moves the catheter to the affected vein. On arrival, the catheter deposits either foam sclerosants or coils that block the vein, reducing its pressure. This will minimize pain because blood will redirect to nearby pathways.

How is the pelvic congestion syndrome recovery journey?

Your vein and vascular specialists at Hamilton Vascular will take a minimum of an hour to perform the procedure. Afterward, they will monitor your blood pressure, heart rate, and catheter insertion, just in case you develop complications. After the recovery period is up, you will be free to resume your daily routine. Do not assume that chronic pelvic pain is a normal thing. Book an appointment with your specialist at Hamilton Vascular to learn more about the available treatment options.  

http://makeyourlifehealthier.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/What-You-Need-to-Know-About-Pelvic-Congestion-Syndrome.pnghttp://makeyourlifehealthier.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/What-You-Need-to-Know-About-Pelvic-Congestion-Syndrome-400x313.pngMake Your Life HealthierHealthRecipesaffect,congestion,diagnosed,diagonse,journey,know,land,menopause,pcs,pelvic,recovery,sugar,syndrome,treated,treatment
Research shows that 30% of women in the prime of their childbearing years suffer from chronic pelvic pain, though most of them fail to seek medical treatment. If only this percentage knew how simple the solution is, they would consult a Sugar Land pelvic congestion syndrome specialist. The persistent...